Upon First Beholding Guenevere or Lancelot

The Arthurian stories present Queen Guenever and Lancelot as so perfect that that they seem to be of another race entirely. I prefer to think that they are just perfect examples of a type of human being whose presence inevitably evokes an almost-violent reaction from the “monkey brain” of anyone who encounters them. In Malory knights speak of another knight being “worshipful,” but for simplicity’s sake I choose to change that to be the passion of Adore towards the opposite sex, and Admire for one’s own.

At the moment, the published rules (GPC page 144) say that for Guenever this is an Amor. But then the rules state there are many exceptions to this particular amor—for instance, that this can be in addition to a real amor… Well, the fact is that this IS different, and is not actually an amor in the sense normally used. My wife suggested Adore.

Adore Guenever. Ah yes, that’s the right word. And it works well for how all those swooning maidens in Malory seem to feel.

And for one’s own gender worshipful may have worked in the Middle Ages, but not now. But Admire — that works

Here is the corrected rule for meeting Guenever for the first time.

For Guenever

The perfection of Guenever is seductive, like enchantment. Everyone who sees her for the first time must immediately determine their Passion for her. It does not matter what particular feature attracts someone—the Queen has it.

Upon First Beholding Guenever

Guenever is the most beautiful woman in Britain. Her figure, bearing and composure combine to stun any observer. To simply see her for the first time causes a deep, involuntary, visceral reaction.

For men, the reaction is one of desire, for women one of trust.

Men

Men must attempt their Lustful Trait +10, with these results:

Critical. You would want her, if such thing was possible. But it is not—after all, she is the king’s wife! Nonetheless, you’ll do just about anything she asks, with pleasure. Acquire an Adore Guenever Passion that is equal to 2d6+8.

Success. You would want her if such thing was possible. It is not—after all, she is the king’s wife! Nonetheless, you’ll do just about anything she asks, with pleasure. Acquire an Adore Guenever Passion that is equal to 4d6+1.

Failure. She is truly stunning, but something about her makes her just not your type. (Could it be that look in her eyes, or maybe just her perfection, or your knowledge that such women are always trouble?) No Passion.

Fumble. You distrust her. Get a Directed Trait of Suspicious of Guenever that is equal to 1d3+1.

Women

Women make an unopposed attempt at Trusting, with these results:

Critical. She is such a great woman that you would do anything to serve her. You get a Directed Trait of Adore Guenever of 4d6+1.

Success. She is an admirable woman, worthy of respect. You get a Directed Trait of Trusting of Guenever of 1d3+1.

Failure. She is beautiful, but just a woman. Her actions will determine how you feel.

Fumble. You feel threatened by her, and you acquire a Directed Trait of Suspicious of Guenever equal to 1d3+1.

For Lancelot

The perfection of Lancelot strikes like magic. Everyone who sees him for the first time must immediately determine this Passion.

At the moment, no published rules cover this, but it is as legitimate as for Lancelot as it is for Guenever. The strong emotions that Lancelot commonly evokes is proof. Among women, the proper term is Adore. For men, it is Admire.

Here is the rule for meeting Lancelot for the first time.

Upon First Beholding Lancelot

Lancelot is stunningly handsome, muscularly perfect, graceful, speaks firmly and confidently, is unfailingly courteous and martially adept to the point of being beautiful (think of Bruce Lee). Everyone has a deep, involuntary, visceral reaction upon their first sight of him.

For men, the reaction is one of fear. For women, one of desire.

Women

Women must attempt their Lustful Trait +10, with these results:

Critical. You have to speak to him some day, though the thought takes your breath away now. You would do anything for him (but never say that out loud!) You acquire an Adore Lancelot Passion of 2d6+8.

Success. He is hot (but don’t say that out loud). You would want him, but you know it’s impossible, so you don’t exactly Lust… (no, really!) As it is you can barely imagine speaking to him. You acquire an Adore Lancelot Passion that is 4d6+1.

Failure. He is truly stunning, but something about him makes him just not your type. (Could it be that all-too perfect musculature, his fairy upbringing, or just your knowledge that such constrained men always lose it, sometime?) No Passion.

Fumble. You distrust him. No one’s that perfect. Get a Directed Trait of Suspicious of Lancelot of 1d3+1.

Men

Attempt Valor -10 Trait, with these results:

Critical. He is obviously a great man and you would do anything to serve him. You get a Passion of Admire Lancelot of 2d6+8.

Success. He’s obviously a competent man, and you’d follow him into any fight. You enjoy watching him in combat. You admire much about him. You have a Directed Trait of Trust Lancelot of 1d3+1.

Failure. He looks like a god, but he’s just a man. His actions will define him. Let’s see.

Fumble. You don’t truly trust him. Something about him. Too perfect. Acquire a Directed Trait of Suspicious of Lancelot equal to 1d3+1.

The Adore Passion

Upon First Beholding Guenevere or Lancelot

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